War of the Worlds

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Where is it filmed? By Katie Archer. On the surface it is a story about the doom of man when the sky opens to release those vicious Martians - but the author enjoys later telling tales of how the human race is doomed and sort of deserves it because we have doomed others, the earth, and been unmerciful to the land, animals, and those tribes or peoples different from us. Wells raises the point of mankind ruthlessly wiping out others due to greed and savagery, without our current day giving it ample remorseful respect.

Bringing up animals, here is one quote among many that points the same theme out -- " Surely, if we have learned nothing else, this war has taught us pity -- pity for those witless souls that suffer our dominion. Wells keeps the philosophy strong by also taking pains to show that, while the Martians are a horrifying creation we have a right to fear, we ourselves are scary to animals and other races we've conquered. Does compare the monstrosity of the Martians with mad of how we destroy the world or have taken no mercy in history on previous human tribes.

When describing the horrors of the Martians feeding, the author then states, "The bare idea of this is no doubt repulsive to us, but at the same time I think that we should remember how repulsive our carnivorous habits would seem to an intelligent rabbit.

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The War of the Worlds, by H. G. Wells

On the downside, the lack of characterization gives a lack of attachment for the reader other than sci-fi colored curiosity. Description only stays interesting up to a point. I've seen that some find the ending anti-climactic, but I loved it. It's fitting, makes reasonable sense, was happy in its way, horrible in its way, suiting in its way.

Not exactly what I was hoping for. The beginning was super interesting, as I loved how the Martians were introduced and the confusion that surrounded them was great. However, the book really dragged on from there, and became quite repetitive and bogged down by excessive detail. This book could have easily been under pages long, but it's actually closer to which felt very dragged out for this simplistic story. Definitely not my favorite Wells! While it may seen inhumane to all the stockbrokers and their dependants, there is some vicarious pleasure to be had in the destruction of Surrey commuter towns by the Martians.

The fear, confusion and rapid break down of late Victorian life following on from the initial attack is striking. The War of the Worlds is one of those science-fiction books that are full of contemporary fears - it is a pre World War One invasion fantasy like The Riddle of the Sands but with the German army transformed in While it may seen inhumane to all the stockbrokers and their dependants, there is some vicarious pleasure to be had in the destruction of Surrey commuter towns by the Martians.

The War of the Worlds is one of those science-fiction books that are full of contemporary fears - it is a pre World War One invasion fantasy like The Riddle of the Sands but with the German army transformed into the Martians.


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Zeppelins and U-Boats transformed into striding tripods and heat rays. The sun may not have set on the British Empire but the fear of destruction lurks everywhere. For Childers and Wells the threat is external and military rather than internal and social. Eventual victory doesn't represent change - just the continuity of militarism. As a vision of Imperial Britain's place in the world it is incredibly narrow and fearful - the application of fight or flight as the only choices in international relations, but as events a few years later would show this was a way of seeing the world that was widespread across Europe.

An interesting feature, particularly maybe from the perspective of empire, is that the aliens are not defeated they self-destruct in an accelerated version of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Martian Empire - if you are going to keep your empire, mere technological superiority is not enough, one needs inner vigilance too otherwise you'll dive into decadence and start mixing your bodily fluids with sub-Martians, then before you know it - you are bird food.

For once then, eugenics turns out to save us all. Mar 29, Owlseyes inside Notre Dame, it's so strange a hour blaze and The article speaks about NASA's visit by A no-return voyage, vegetarians by force To my knowledge, though thousands worldwide had already applied, there are 8 Portuguese people ready to embark; but only 4 of them disclosed their names. Ages between 19 and Maybe one of them up there Dreams that never end, Mr Wells. Yes, this is truly a classic of science fiction; a book first published in Truly, a paranoid vision of a planet close to ours: a place that receives only "half of the light" of the sun, and whose hardened-hearts inhabitants "carry warfare" sunward.

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They see our green planet And their "intelligences are greater than ours". They watch us keenly. It's the end of the 19th century and astronomer Ogilvy at Ottershaw village, England, wonders about the "thing" they "were sending us". People used to scoffle at the idea of "Mars inhabitants": a vulgar one. And then for 10 nights a flame was watched: and it happened: the falling star reached Earth! Ogilvy tried to find it There was a thing buried on the ground: a hot huge cylinder in Horsell Cadron But nobody believes this report.

The cylinder was of a yellowish white metal Excavations start. Stent, the Astronomer Royal is called upon Out of the cylinder came little tentacles, like a little grey snake There's horror around. An ungovernable terror is gripping the main character. The Deputy attempted to communicate with a white flag From the cylinder emanates a flash of light, a greenish smoke More troops are deployed, another cordon of soldiers And yet, out of that area people carry on the routine.

Some are curious to know how "they" live on another planet. Ogilvy said that it's impossible for Martians to live on Earth: due to the excess of oxygen and the gravitation force here being 3 times higher than Mars'. Meanwhile, the main character had his last civilized meal.

Why hasn't the story been printed in a London paper yet? Girlfriend or Mars? Sad news: it seems the Lander was "destroyed on impact".


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View all 19 comments. Probably everyone knows the basic plot, so there is no need to elaborate -- Martians come, they kick humanity's collective ass.

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The story is narrated by an average if well-educated guy who happens to see the arrival and survive, and is scrambling around trying to find food without getting seen in the process. Contra the movies, he is not heroic or important to the outcome of the invasion, which I thought an intriguing authorial choice.

A couple aspects that were interesting to me: --The narrator Probably everyone knows the basic plot, so there is no need to elaborate -- Martians come, they kick humanity's collective ass. A couple aspects that were interesting to me: --The narrator several times mentions that how humans are feeling as the Martians prey upon them must be similar to the helplessness and fear that animals feel when we hunt and kill them.

The Martians are abhorrent to us because they are killing us, and also look hideous to us, but that's perspective. From their point of view they are doing nothing wrong. I wonder if their have been any reception studies done on how Wells' contemporaries felt about this position?

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Has anyone ever written a follow-up novel in this setting? It seems like such an obvious idea especially with the end point that the Martians could attack again and Earth needs to prepare that I cannot believe no author has done it, but I haven't encountered such a book. Why is the cover bright pink? Doesn't really suit the tone of the book, and I doubt that was colored by Gorey. I somewhat lazily and arbitrarily clicked this book onto my "science fiction" Goodreads shelf, but it isn't, not really.

Sure, the monsters happened to come from Mars, but that isn't essential to the plot. They could just as easily have come from deep under the ground, from the bottom of the ocean, or from Mordor.

All the story requires is that they be from Somewhere Else, and Mars fills that bill perfectly well. So, leaving aside the creatures' extraterrestrial origins, War of the Worlds succeed I somewhat lazily and arbitrarily clicked this book onto my "science fiction" Goodreads shelf, but it isn't, not really. So, leaving aside the creatures' extraterrestrial origins, War of the Worlds succeeds on several levels. For one, it's one of the most gripping and legitimately frightening horror stories to come out of the 19th century; the intelligent, but overwhelmed and slightly unreliable narrator gives a desperate, panicky edge to the story.

This suits the material perfectly: if you propose to chronicle the end of the world, a little panic goes a long way towards selling it. The story also succeeds as an ecological fable.